Beer, Beer and More Beer!

Beer, Beer and More Beer!

Beer!.jpg
Beer System Basics

Whether you’re attending a beer festival, going to your best friend’s wedding or wanting to sit back and kick your shoes off from a long work week, one thing is for sure — a nice refreshing beer usually does the trick. 

Beer systems play a huge part in most restaurants and facilities around the world, and theCo2Can.jpgbest spots make sure that every beer is poured at its finest.  Every bar or restaurant needs a dependable draft beer dispensing system if it wants to be able to satisfy all its customers.  When it comes to purchasing a new draft beer system, it’s highly recommended to hire a professional to come out and install your system.  But it’s also a smart thing as an owner to know exactly how your draft beer dispensing system works. 

So how does a draft beer system work exactly? 

Under pressure

Inside a CO2 or mixed (CO2/Nitrogen) tank is pressurized gas that helps propel beer from the keg to the beer dispensing faucet.  When the high-pressure gas is pushed into the keg through the coupler, it forces the liquid gold out into the beer line where it travels to the tap.  (Keep in mind, the line pulls beer from the bottom of the keg, so store any beers that might contain settled solids upside down!)  

Controlling the pressure is very important, so that you don’t wind up dispensing a foamy beer to your customers.  To help prevent that from happening, a primary regulator is installed on the tank.  The regulator also insures that the built-up gas inside the tank does its job correctly.  The coupler attaches directly to the keg with an air-tight seal.  The probe of the coupler pushes directly down into the keg valve and acts as a critical junction point in your draft beer dispensing.  The coupler has two connections, one for the air line and one for the beer line to attach.  The beer line is pretty much just like the air line, except it attaches directly to the coupler on one side and the shank or faucet on the other and carries beer instead of gas. 

Wires.jpg

Keep it cool

If your beer kegs are stored out of sight away from your dispensing tower then you will need to invest in a glycol system powered by a power pack.  This system contains a mixture of food-grade antifreeze and water, which rests directly next to your beer lines inside of an insulated foam trunk line.  With a set-up like this the beer can travel up to 500 feet and maintain a steady, perfectly chilled temperature, so you can be confident that every beer you pour is at its finest and most refreshing. 

TapSystem.jpg

Towers and Taps

The draft beer tower is where beer gets poured from and where all your beer lines are housed.  The beer lines are attached to faucets inside the beer tower.  Draft beer towers come in many different styles and configurations to suit installation need, including options for the location to attach the tower to the bar top, the wall, or even the ceiling. 

Along with beer tower options, there are a variety of tap faucets to choose from.  There are standard economy faucets that will let you pull a basic pour, but premium options help you provide a better overall experience for your customer by controlling flow, offering creamier action, and generally allowing for a more sanitary experience that presents your beer in the finest possible light. 

Taps.jpg

Good to the last drop

For a final touch, add a drip tray — who wants to be constantly wiping up drips or spills?  A drip tray is a seemingly insignificant detail that can make a big difference in the efficiency of your service and overall cleanliness of your facility.  It’s the little touches to help you keep a clean and inviting area for customers to enjoy a nice cold beer. 

Room.jpg

Cheers!

Now familiar with the basic components of a draft beer system, you have the general information you need to take the next step and contact a manufacturer to help set you up with a system that works best for your facility.

Beer!.jpg
Beer System Basics

Whether you’re attending a beer festival, going to your best friend’s wedding or wanting to sit back and kick your shoes off from a long work week, one thing is for sure — a nice refreshing beer usually does the trick. 

Beer systems play a huge part in most restaurants and facilities around the world, and theCo2Can.jpgbest spots make sure that every beer is poured at its finest.  Every bar or restaurant needs a dependable draft beer dispensing system if it wants to be able to satisfy all its customers.  When it comes to purchasing a new draft beer system, it’s highly recommended to hire a professional to come out and install your system.  But it’s also a smart thing as an owner to know exactly how your draft beer dispensing system works. 

So how does a draft beer system work exactly? 

Under pressure

Inside a CO2 or mixed (CO2/Nitrogen) tank is pressurized gas that helps propel beer from the keg to the beer dispensing faucet.  When the high-pressure gas is pushed into the keg through the coupler, it forces the liquid gold out into the beer line where it travels to the tap.  (Keep in mind, the line pulls beer from the bottom of the keg, so store any beers that might contain settled solids upside down!)  

Controlling the pressure is very important, so that you don’t wind up dispensing a foamy beer to your customers.  To help prevent that from happening, a primary regulator is installed on the tank.  The regulator also insures that the built-up gas inside the tank does its job correctly.  The coupler attaches directly to the keg with an air-tight seal.  The probe of the coupler pushes directly down into the keg valve and acts as a critical junction point in your draft beer dispensing.  The coupler has two connections, one for the air line and one for the beer line to attach.  The beer line is pretty much just like the air line, except it attaches directly to the coupler on one side and the shank or faucet on the other and carries beer instead of gas. 

Wires.jpg

Keep it cool

If your beer kegs are stored out of sight away from your dispensing tower then you will need to invest in a glycol system powered by a power pack.  This system contains a mixture of food-grade antifreeze and water, which rests directly next to your beer lines inside of an insulated foam trunk line.  With a set-up like this the beer can travel up to 500 feet and maintain a steady, perfectly chilled temperature, so you can be confident that every beer you pour is at its finest and most refreshing. 

TapSystem.jpg

Towers and Taps

The draft beer tower is where beer gets poured from and where all your beer lines are housed.  The beer lines are attached to faucets inside the beer tower.  Draft beer towers come in many different styles and configurations to suit installation need, including options for the location to attach the tower to the bar top, the wall, or even the ceiling. 

Along with beer tower options, there are a variety of tap faucets to choose from.  There are standard economy faucets that will let you pull a basic pour, but premium options help you provide a better overall experience for your customer by controlling flow, offering creamier action, and generally allowing for a more sanitary experience that presents your beer in the finest possible light. 

Taps.jpg

Good to the last drop

For a final touch, add a drip tray — who wants to be constantly wiping up drips or spills?  A drip tray is a seemingly insignificant detail that can make a big difference in the efficiency of your service and overall cleanliness of your facility.  It’s the little touches to help you keep a clean and inviting area for customers to enjoy a nice cold beer. 

Room.jpg

Cheers!

Now familiar with the basic components of a draft beer system, you have the general information you need to take the next step and contact a manufacturer to help set you up with a system that works best for your facility.